Heritage Trail
Image

DISTANCE

1.2kms Loop

Image

ACCESS

Cycle or Walk - Family Friendly

Image

START / END

Edenvale Homestead

Image

SEASON

All Year

START YOUR JOURNEY

Welcome to the beautiful, historic town of Pinjarra.

The Pinjarra Heritage Trail is an easy 1.2 km walk along the main street of town visiting historic buildings and locations that played an important role in early settlement of Pinjarra.  Starting from Edenvale, the trail includes multiple stops of interest informed by interpretive signage that shares the significance of these important places and sites.  Highlights include the old Post Office (1895) and Court House (1935), St John's Church (consecrated in 1863 and deconsecrated in 2019), the Old Schoolhouse (1896), the former privately owned Liveringa (1885) and Edenvale Homestead (1888) which was home to one of WA’s early Premiers, Sir Ross McLarty and his family.

Print The Trail Map

EDENVALE HOMESTEAD

Trail Start -  Stop 1

Image
Edenvale was built in 1888 for Edward McLarty and his family. Edward McLarty was active in both Local and State politics, being a member of the Murray Roads Board for nearly 40 years, as well as being elected to the Legislative Council representing the South-West Province for 22 years.  Edward and his wife Mary worked hard and had many diversified business interests, including; operating the first butchers shop from the back of the Homestead, ran a general store, operated a coach business from Perth to Busselton twice a week, constructed, owned and operated the Premier Hotel in Pinjarra, and farmed cattle, both locally, as well as in the Kimberley.

GILMOUR'S GARAGE

Trail Stop 2

Pinjarra Motor Garage was opened on the corner of George and James Streets in 1919 by A. G. Denny. However, it seems to have been unsuccessful and quickly closed. In 1924 the building was taken over by Ernie Gilmour, who quickly established a good reputation in the area. Ernie had a lot of experience in the car and motorcycle business, having worked in both Perth and Bunbury for some time. He advertised that he could not only fix cars, but machinery of every description.
Image

THE COPPER KETTLE

Trail Stop 3

Image

The Copper Kettle Tea Rooms opened in 1936. Originally called the ‘Central Tea Rooms,’ it became a popular stopover for holidaymakers and travellers to the South West. The tea rooms were ideally placed to capture the rising numbers of day trippers travelling in the new form of transport, the car.  Established by sisters Gwen and Pam, from the pioneering Fawcett family, and progeny of Captain T. Fawcett, it was a popular place for the local to meet and chat.

MECHANIC's HALL

Trail Stop 4

On this site stood the Mechanics’ Institute Hall. The hall was officially opened on 30th October 1884 with a public ball given in honour of the occasion. The ball was a success with the guests dancing until dawn. The land was donated by Joseph Logue with the hall built of locally made red brick supplied by Edward McLarty and roofed in local shingles.
Image

TRINITY CHURCH

Trail Stop 5

Image

The Trinity Church is one of the oldest Uniting Churches in Western Australia. Built in 1910 as a Methodist Church, in 1977 the congregations of the Presbyterian Church, Congregational Union of Australia and Methodist Church combined to create the Uniting Church.  When the original Church was completed, the west wall was left in weatherboard so that an addition could be made in the future. Extensions were delayed until 1934-5 due to World Wars 1 and 2 and the Great Depression- but eventually a vestry, kitchen, manse and Church hall extensions were built. In 2006 the tile roof was replaced with metal.

The baptismal font was donated by Mr W. Morrell in memory of his parents, and the organ was donated to the Church in 1951 by the Taylor family. The Church’s motto is: To be the face of God in the community. Services are held Sunday at 9am.

MURRAY ROADS BOARD OFFICE

Trail Stop 6

The Murray Roads Board was set up in 1871 after the WA Legislative Council passed Acts allowing for the formation of local authorities. The purpose of the Roads Board was to make recommendations to the Legislative Council about road and infrastructure expenditure. Members of the Roads Board were comprised of elected local landowners.  At the first election for the Murray Roads Board held 20th February 1871 Messrs J. Logue (Chairman), A. Birch, T. Fawcett, H. Hall, H. Sutton, J. Wellard and J. Batt were elected.

Image

OLD COURT HOUSE

Trail Stop 7

Image
Whilst the current building dates to 1935, the site was used for court and justice services for 138 years. Prior to a court house being built, the Resident Magistrate held sessions at the Oakley Inn on the east side of the Murray River. The Resident Magistrate provided banking and other government department representation, in addition to justice. The first Court House was built in 1864 of brick and shingle, next to the police station, on the land formerly occupied by the military barracks. The building also featured a verandah and a reportedly beautiful garden that was tended to by the prisoners held in the lockup in the police station.

POST OFFICE

Trail Stop 8

Pinjarra Post Office was built in 1896 by H. Parker and designed by the renowned Colonial Architect George Temple-Poole. The building was designed to accommodate the workings of the Post Office on the ground floor and private residence for the Post Master and family on the upper floor.

In 1923 the building underwent alterations and extensions, including the installation of a telephone exchange, with the works completed under the supervision of W. Hardwick, Principle Architect of the Public Works Department. The incorporation of the telephone exchange meant that by 1926 calls could be made 24 hours a day. This meant that the junior messenger boy slept overnight in the Exchange room to attend to any night calls.

Image

EDENVALE HOMESTEAD

Trail Start -  Stop 1

Image
Edenvale was built in 1888 for Edward McLarty and his family. Edward McLarty was active in both Local and State politics, being a member of the Murray Roads Board for nearly 40 years, as well as being elected to the Legislative Council representing the South-West Province for 22 years.  Edward and his wife Mary worked hard and had many diversified business interests, including; operating the first butchers shop from the back of the Homestead, ran a general store, operated a coach business from Perth to Busselton twice a week, constructed, owned and operated the Premier Hotel in Pinjarra, and farmed cattle, both locally, as well as in the Kimberley.

GILMOUR'S GARAGE

Trail Stop 2

Image
Pinjarra Motor Garage was opened on the corner of George and James Streets in 1919 by A. G. Denny. However, it seems to have been unsuccessful and quickly closed. In 1924 the building was taken over by Ernie Gilmour, who quickly established a good reputation in the area. Ernie had a lot of experience in the car and motorcycle business, having worked in both Perth and Bunbury for some time. He advertised that he could not only fix cars, but machinery of every description.

THE COPPER KETTLE

Trail Stop 3

Image

The Copper Kettle Tea Rooms opened in 1936. Originally called the ‘Central Tea Rooms,’ it became a popular stopover for holidaymakers and travellers to the South West. The tea rooms were ideally placed to capture the rising numbers of day trippers travelling in the new form of transport, the car.  Established by sisters Gwen and Pam, from the pioneering Fawcett family, and progeny of Captain T. Fawcett, it was a popular place for the local to meet and chat.

MECHANIC's HALL

Trail Stop 4

Image
On this site stood the Mechanics’ Institute Hall. The hall was officially opened on 30th October 1884 with a public ball given in honour of the occasion. The ball was a success with the guests dancing until dawn. The land was donated by Joseph Logue with the hall built of locally made red brick supplied by Edward McLarty and roofed in local shingles.

TRINITY CHURCH

Trail Stop 5

Image

The Trinity Church is one of the oldest Uniting Churches in Western Australia. Built in 1910 as a Methodist Church, in 1977 the congregations of the Presbyterian Church, Congregational Union of Australia and Methodist Church combined to create the Uniting Church.  When the original Church was completed, the west wall was left in weatherboard so that an addition could be made in the future. Extensions were delayed until 1934-5 due to World Wars 1 and 2 and the Great Depression- but eventually a vestry, kitchen, manse and Church hall extensions were built. In 2006 the tile roof was replaced with metal.

The baptismal font was donated by Mr W. Morrell in memory of his parents, and the organ was donated to the Church in 1951 by the Taylor family. The Church’s motto is: To be the face of God in the community. Services are held Sunday at 9am.

MURRAY ROADS BOARD OFFICE

Trail Stop 6

Image

The Murray Roads Board was set up in 1871 after the WA Legislative Council passed Acts allowing for the formation of local authorities. The purpose of the Roads Board was to make recommendations to the Legislative Council about road and infrastructure expenditure. Members of the Roads Board were comprised of elected local landowners.  At the first election for the Murray Roads Board held 20th February 1871 Messrs J. Logue (Chairman), A. Birch, T. Fawcett, H. Hall, H. Sutton, J. Wellard and J. Batt were elected.

OLD COURT HOUSE

Trail Stop 7

Image
Whilst the current building dates to 1935, the site was used for court and justice services for 138 years. Prior to a court house being built, the Resident Magistrate held sessions at the Oakley Inn on the east side of the Murray River. The Resident Magistrate provided banking and other government department representation, in addition to justice. The first Court House was built in 1864 of brick and shingle, next to the police station, on the land formerly occupied by the military barracks. The building also featured a verandah and a reportedly beautiful garden that was tended to by the prisoners held in the lockup in the police station.

POST OFFICE

Trail Stop 8

Image

Pinjarra Post Office was built in 1896 by H. Parker and designed by the renowned Colonial Architect George Temple-Poole. The building was designed to accommodate the workings of the Post Office on the ground floor and private residence for the Post Master and family on the upper floor.

In 1923 the building underwent alterations and extensions, including the installation of a telephone exchange, with the works completed under the supervision of W. Hardwick, Principle Architect of the Public Works Department. The incorporation of the telephone exchange meant that by 1926 calls could be made 24 hours a day. This meant that the junior messenger boy slept overnight in the Exchange room to attend to any night calls.

SUSPENSION BRIDGE

Trail Start -  Stop 9

Image
The Suspension Bridge across the Murray River is a popular tourist attraction which provides a pedestrian link from the east side residential area to the town centre.  The bridge was constructed by the 22nd Construction Regiment (renamed 22nd Engineer Regiment in 2013), Royal Australian Engineers, Australian Army. This Regiment’s motto is: ‘with diligence and honour’ and consists primarily of reservists and in particular provides aid to local communities and emergency services during disaster response. The Regiment is also deployed overseas for humanitarian and peace-keeping missions.

EXCHANGE HOTEL

Trail Stop 10

The Exchange Hotel is one of the earliest buildings within the Pinjarra town site being built in c. 1866. The building was constructed as a dwelling for Dr. Bedingfeld before being converted to a hotel in 1871. The Exchange Hotel has been renovated and added onto many times over the years, not always sympathetically, rendering it a maze of interconnected rooms and passages.  The Exchange operated as a hotel, providing both accommodation and a public bar, until 2008, when the place closed. The Shire of Murray purchased the hotel in 2012 with the intent to redevelop and retain the significant heritage parts of the sprawling structure.
Image

TAYLOR's STORE

Trail Stop 11

Image

The store, founded by William Taylor in 1897, helped to kick off one of the oldest family businesses in Western Australia.  During the early 1890s the W.A. Government, under Sir John Forrest, embarked on a major railway building program to provide better connection and communication across the state. The rail line from Perth to Bunbury reached Pinjarra in 1893 and brought with it new economic opportunity and new people, including Mr Taylor.   1897 Pinjarra featured few businesses, with many farmers selling direct to residents. Mr Taylor saw an opportunity and bought two blocks of land next to the Exchange Hotel. He built the shop on the land now occupied by Miss Adam’s House, but in 1906 the building burnt down. The present shop and attached residence were built soon after.

MISS ADAM's HOUSE

Trail Stop 12

Miss Adam’s House is a landmark on George Street being built in an impressive interwar Old English Style. The house was built in 1932 for sisters Constance (b. 1881, d. 1934) and Clara (sometimes called Claire) (b. 1882, d. 1961). The sisters accepted boarders into the house, primarily school teachers working at the local school. The Adam sisters are fondly remembered as being fiercely independent and capable women who were very active in the community having been involved with the CWA, Murray Horticultural Society and the St John’s Church, and in various fundraising campaigns for the local school, hospital and other social causes.
Image

CANTWELL PARK

Trail Stop 13

Image

Cantwell Park has served as a popular recreation spot for residents and visitors to Pinjarra for over a century. Up until 1914 the land was used by the Roads Board Secretary as a horse paddock, and before that, as the town rubbish tip.

In the early 1920s a charismatic teacher, Mr A.R. Cantwell, persuaded the Roads Board to convert the land into a memorial park to commemorate the fallen soldiers of the Great War. Soon after the Roads Board were gifted a war souvenir for Memorial Park, a German trench mortar. In 1923 a Mahogany Creek granite war memorial was erected (now relocated to the Pinjarra Civic Centre).

Cantwell was instrumental in the formation of the Pinjarra branch of the Returned Soldiers League (RSL) a few years earlier. School children levelled the site by hand, dug flower beds, planted trees and watered the garden using kerosene tins of water from the river during the summer months. On weekends, Mr Cantwell would cut the grass with a scythe.

THE WEIR

Trail Stop 14

In 1893 Pinjarra Rail Station opened with the rail line being extended down from Perth. A regular supply of fresh water was needed to cool the boilers on the steam trains and so in 1895 the weir was constructed to prevent estuary salt moving upstream. By the mid-1920s the Murray Roads Board faced pressure from residents to modernise town facilities and provide a reticulated water supply. The Pinjarra Water Supply Scheme was launched in January 1926 with water being pumped from the billabong behind the Roads Board Office, upstream of the weir, into tanks on stands. The water was then gravity fed into town.

Image

TRAFFIC BRIDGE

Trail Stop 15

Image

The main overland route from the Swan River colony to the Leschenault (Bunbury) passed through Pinjarra as there was less rivers to cross and as the river crossing in Peel Town (Mandurah) was considered too dangerous. The trail was cut by Lieutenant Henry Bunbury, officer in charge of the Pinjarra Military Barracks from 1836 and is said to have largely followed existing Aboriginal tracks.

Pinjarra was surveyed late 1836 and broken up into town lots. The take up of property was slow; however, by the early 1840s there was a population large enough to need a bridge over the Murray.

ST JOHN's CHURCHYARD

Trail Stop 16

The first settlers in the Murray District initially worshiped in a barn on George Bouglas’ farm, north of the Murray and Dandalup Rivers in the Ravenswood area. Bouglas’ farm was chosen as is was centrally located to the other settlers’ allotments. George Bouglas was a former servant of Thomas Peel, after whom the Peel region is named.

In 1840 the settlers lobbied the Colonial Secretary for a place of worship. Thomas Peel offered to donate 200Ha along with £50 towards construction of the church building. However, bitter rivalries with other settlers saw Peel retract his offer. The Governor granted two allotments in the Pinjarra townsite on the banks of the Murray River. The first church was built in 1843 close to the location of the current church building. The original church was basic being constructed of whitewashed wattle and daub walls and a thatched roof. By 1860 the church was dilapidated and a public meeting was held to replace the church.

Image

SUSPENSION BRIDGE

Trail Start -  Stop 9

Image
The Suspension Bridge across the Murray River is a popular tourist attraction which provides a pedestrian link from the east side residential area to the town centre.  The bridge was constructed by the 22nd Construction Regiment (renamed 22nd Engineer Regiment in 2013), Royal Australian Engineers, Australian Army. This Regiment’s motto is: ‘with diligence and honour’ and consists primarily of reservists and in particular provides aid to local communities and emergency services during disaster response. The Regiment is also deployed overseas for humanitarian and peace-keeping missions.

EXCHANGE HOTEL

Trail Stop 10

Image
The Exchange Hotel is one of the earliest buildings within the Pinjarra town site being built in c. 1866. The building was constructed as a dwelling for Dr. Bedingfeld before being converted to a hotel in 1871. The Exchange Hotel has been renovated and added onto many times over the years, not always sympathetically, rendering it a maze of interconnected rooms and passages.  The Exchange operated as a hotel, providing both accommodation and a public bar, until 2008, when the place closed. The Shire of Murray purchased the hotel in 2012 with the intent to redevelop and retain the significant heritage parts of the sprawling structure.

TAYLOR's STORE

Trail Stop 11

Image

The store, founded by William Taylor in 1897, helped to kick off one of the oldest family businesses in Western Australia.  During the early 1890s the W.A. Government, under Sir John Forrest, embarked on a major railway building program to provide better connection and communication across the state. The rail line from Perth to Bunbury reached Pinjarra in 1893 and brought with it new economic opportunity and new people, including Mr Taylor.   1897 Pinjarra featured few businesses, with many farmers selling direct to residents. Mr Taylor saw an opportunity and bought two blocks of land next to the Exchange Hotel. He built the shop on the land now occupied by Miss Adam’s House, but in 1906 the building burnt down. The present shop and attached residence were built soon after.

MISS ADAM's HOUSE

Trail Stop 12

Image
Miss Adam’s House is a landmark on George Street being built in an impressive interwar Old English Style. The house was built in 1932 for sisters Constance (b. 1881, d. 1934) and Clara (sometimes called Claire) (b. 1882, d. 1961). The sisters accepted boarders into the house, primarily school teachers working at the local school. The Adam sisters are fondly remembered as being fiercely independent and capable women who were very active in the community having been involved with the CWA, Murray Horticultural Society and the St John’s Church, and in various fundraising campaigns for the local school, hospital and other social causes.

CANTWELL PARK

Trail Stop 13

Image

Cantwell Park has served as a popular recreation spot for residents and visitors to Pinjarra for over a century. Up until 1914 the land was used by the Roads Board Secretary as a horse paddock, and before that, as the town rubbish tip.

In the early 1920s a charismatic teacher, Mr A.R. Cantwell, persuaded the Roads Board to convert the land into a memorial park to commemorate the fallen soldiers of the Great War. Soon after the Roads Board were gifted a war souvenir for Memorial Park, a German trench mortar. In 1923 a Mahogany Creek granite war memorial was erected (now relocated to the Pinjarra Civic Centre).

Cantwell was instrumental in the formation of the Pinjarra branch of the Returned Soldiers League (RSL) a few years earlier. School children levelled the site by hand, dug flower beds, planted trees and watered the garden using kerosene tins of water from the river during the summer months. On weekends, Mr Cantwell would cut the grass with a scythe.

THE WEIR

Trail Stop 14

Image

In 1893 Pinjarra Rail Station opened with the rail line being extended down from Perth. A regular supply of fresh water was needed to cool the boilers on the steam trains and so in 1895 the weir was constructed to prevent estuary salt moving upstream. By the mid-1920s the Murray Roads Board faced pressure from residents to modernise town facilities and provide a reticulated water supply. The Pinjarra Water Supply Scheme was launched in January 1926 with water being pumped from the billabong behind the Roads Board Office, upstream of the weir, into tanks on stands. The water was then gravity fed into town.

TRAFFIC BRIDGE

Trail Stop 15

Image

The main overland route from the Swan River colony to the Leschenault (Bunbury) passed through Pinjarra as there was less rivers to cross and as the river crossing in Peel Town (Mandurah) was considered too dangerous. The trail was cut by Lieutenant Henry Bunbury, officer in charge of the Pinjarra Military Barracks from 1836 and is said to have largely followed existing Aboriginal tracks.

Pinjarra was surveyed late 1836 and broken up into town lots. The take up of property was slow; however, by the early 1840s there was a population large enough to need a bridge over the Murray.

ST JOHN's CHURCHYARD

Trail Stop 16

Image

The first settlers in the Murray District initially worshiped in a barn on George Bouglas’ farm, north of the Murray and Dandalup Rivers in the Ravenswood area. Bouglas’ farm was chosen as is was centrally located to the other settlers’ allotments. George Bouglas was a former servant of Thomas Peel, after whom the Peel region is named.

In 1840 the settlers lobbied the Colonial Secretary for a place of worship. Thomas Peel offered to donate 200Ha along with £50 towards construction of the church building. However, bitter rivalries with other settlers saw Peel retract his offer. The Governor granted two allotments in the Pinjarra townsite on the banks of the Murray River. The first church was built in 1843 close to the location of the current church building. The original church was basic being constructed of whitewashed wattle and daub walls and a thatched roof. By 1860 the church was dilapidated and a public meeting was held to replace the church.

OLD RECTORY

Trail Start -  Stop 17

Image

Pinjarra’s original Anglican rectory was constructed around 1873, serving its purpose for 80 years before being demolished. It was built to house the first Reverend of the Murray District Anglican parish, James Stuart Price and his family. It is widely believed that the original site was chosen to escape the regular incidence of flooding of the Murray River. Before residing in the rectory, Reverend Price lived with the Oakley family on their farm on the east side of the river.

Reverend Price arrived in the colony in 1861 and soon after was appointed to Surrogate of the Murray District, which included Waroona, Mandurah, Coolup, Dandalup as well as Pinjarra. He energetically threw himself into developing Pinjarra, not just spiritually, but culturally and educationally, being a keen amatuer artist (selling his watercolours to raise funds for the church), establishing a choir, serving as Chaplain to the Pinjarra Mounted Volunteers and on the Murray Districts Board of Education. The Price family became very popular and well-liked within the small community. Reverend Price died in Pinjarra in 1878 at the age of 47 and is buried in the St John’s Churchyard.

GLEBE LAND

Trail Stop 18

Next to St. John’s Church was ‘glebe land’, for the Rector’s private use. This stretched from the boat ramp to the church itself. The Inquirer and Commercial News (Perth W.A. 1855-1901) reported in July 1866 under the Public Works section of the paper that the glebe land was first cleared and then three rail fencing and a gate were installed by convicts. The works for the St. John’s church was completed at the same time, under the supervision of the Clerk of Works of the Convict Department. In the glebe, citrus and olive trees were planted, along with ornamental trees to make the location feel more ‘English’.

Image

MURRAY RIVER

Trail Stop 19

Image
The Murray River was named by Governor James Stirling after the Secretary of State for the Colonial Office in London, Sir George Murray. The discovery of the Murray excited Western Australian colonists. Perth and Fremantle were unsuited to agriculture, so a river surrounded by good soil, with access from the sea, was exactly what settlers required in order to successfully propagate from the land. For much of Pinjarra’s existence, the Murray River has caused extensive damage to the town and infrastructure through numerous incidences of flooding. Between the early 1900s until the end of the Second World War, a concerted effort had been made to draining flood-prone areas of the Murray. To this day, approximately one-third of all land within the Peel-Harvey catchment region lies within one hundred meters of a man made stream, river or agricultural drain.

EDENVALE HERITAGE TEAROOMS

Trail End

Your trail concludes at the Edenvale Heritage Precinct where you can explore more living history.

Operating from the 100 plus year old Homestead, the Edenvale Heritage Tearooms are a must do in Pinjarra. Enjoy wholesome food or a famous Edenvale scone in the comfort of the dining room or overlooking the peaceful gardens before exploring the Edenvale Heritage Precinct.

 

Image

OLD RECTORY

Trail Start -  Stop 17

Image

Pinjarra’s original Anglican rectory was constructed around 1873, serving its purpose for 80 years before being demolished. It was built to house the first Reverend of the Murray District Anglican parish, James Stuart Price and his family. It is widely believed that the original site was chosen to escape the regular incidence of flooding of the Murray River. Before residing in the rectory, Reverend Price lived with the Oakley family on their farm on the east side of the river.

Reverend Price arrived in the colony in 1861 and soon after was appointed to Surrogate of the Murray District, which included Waroona, Mandurah, Coolup, Dandalup as well as Pinjarra. He energetically threw himself into developing Pinjarra, not just spiritually, but culturally and educationally, being a keen amatuer artist (selling his watercolours to raise funds for the church), establishing a choir, serving as Chaplain to the Pinjarra Mounted Volunteers and on the Murray Districts Board of Education. The Price family became very popular and well-liked within the small community. Reverend Price died in Pinjarra in 1878 at the age of 47 and is buried in the St John’s Churchyard.

GLEBE LAND

Trail Stop 18

Image

Next to St. John’s Church was ‘glebe land’, for the Rector’s private use. This stretched from the boat ramp to the church itself. The Inquirer and Commercial News (Perth W.A. 1855-1901) reported in July 1866 under the Public Works section of the paper that the glebe land was first cleared and then three rail fencing and a gate were installed by convicts. The works for the St. John’s church was completed at the same time, under the supervision of the Clerk of Works of the Convict Department. In the glebe, citrus and olive trees were planted, along with ornamental trees to make the location feel more ‘English’.

MURRAY RIVER

Trail Stop 19

Image
The Murray River was named by Governor James Stirling after the Secretary of State for the Colonial Office in London, Sir George Murray. The discovery of the Murray excited Western Australian colonists. Perth and Fremantle were unsuited to agriculture, so a river surrounded by good soil, with access from the sea, was exactly what settlers required in order to successfully propagate from the land. For much of Pinjarra’s existence, the Murray River has caused extensive damage to the town and infrastructure through numerous incidences of flooding. Between the early 1900s until the end of the Second World War, a concerted effort had been made to draining flood-prone areas of the Murray. To this day, approximately one-third of all land within the Peel-Harvey catchment region lies within one hundred meters of a man made stream, river or agricultural drain.

EDENVALE HERITAGE TEAROOMS

Trail End

Image

Your trail concludes at the Edenvale Heritage Precinct where you can explore more living history.

Operating from the 100 plus year old Homestead, the Edenvale Heritage Tearooms are a must do in Pinjarra. Enjoy wholesome food or a famous Edenvale scone in the comfort of the dining room or overlooking the peaceful gardens before exploring the Edenvale Heritage Precinct.

 

 

TASTY TREATS AWAIT IN PINJARRA

Fuel up for a day exploring the heritage trail and stop in at one of Pinjarra's quirky cafes.